KFJC 89.7FM

Music Reviews

Parker,Drumm and Zerang, Jeff, Kevin, Michael – Out Trios Volume 2 (Atavistic)

outlier   2/9/2005   CD, Jazz

Parker Drumm Zerang – Out Trios Volume 2 (Atavistic)
A musical maelstrom of free sounds from 2 gtr w/ elec and drums of the organic noise variety with fuge-like interchanges as home base. Sounds like what the main character of Memento heard in his head when he tried to remember shit. Flashing, percolating meshes of sonic sorcery with sustained ferocity. The 2nd release of the Out Trios on Atavistic but definitely not 2nd place stuff. Ranges from an active continuum of surging flashpoints with chopped guitar to Hafleresque soundscapes with driving drums or chord progression mutations. Out of the Chicago scene, Parker (Chicago Underground Duo, Isotope, Tortoise), Drumm (Vandermark territorial band) and Zerang (Solisitice w/ Hamid Drake) get OUT and take you on their journey to the other side – the OUTSIDE ! “Onslaught” smashes the sonic barrier.
3w: Massive Memento Maelstrom
– Outlier

Ware, David S Quartet – Oblations and Blessings (Silkheart)

outlier   2/9/2005   CD, Jazz

David S Ware Quartet – Oblations and Blessings (Silkheart)
No bowties here, this is the HARD stuff ! Jazz in attack mode elegance and ballad ballistics. Ware catches the TRANE out of town and out of the stratosphere, blasting the quartet’s way to new truths communicable only in phrases of music. The musical messages within have concise urgency like a war zone reporter on a 1m call to the main bureau. This is Ware in ’95 backed by Shipp, Parker and Dickey – a classic quartet of ts-pn-bs-dr whose heritage is of pure late Impulse era Coltrane Quartet stuff. Undeniable momentum forward, upward and OUT, leveraged by Shipp’s McCoy Tyner/ John Hicks style of comping.
3w: Coltrane Resurrection Revelation !
– Outlier

Deerhunter – s/t

outlier   2/9/2005   12-inch, A Library

Deerhunter – s/t (Stickfigure Records)
Tight and dirty rock sound with standard song structures delivered with undoubtedly above standard, angry and pissed off vocals. Riffs reminiscent of SoCal early 90’s rock (Drive Like Jehu’s 1st, Distorted Pony) are hypercharged by the vocalist’s undying conviction that everything is still fucked – thus the necessity for a refrain of the straight ahead pissed off rock sound. 2 gtr-bs-dr with some other stuff occasionally dubbed on top, this foursome from Atlanta definitely give an urgent sound to otherwise familiar structures in this debut release.
3w: Repenting is Weakness
– Outlier

Deerhoof s/t

outlier   2/9/2005   7-inch, A Library

Se Piagi Se Ridi- Perfect for the next wake party you may be planning. Maybe like a Caroliner pop excursion if it existed. Funeral organ, banjo (?) and drums accompany this eulogy for the pop song. Childlike vocal wanderings call you to the netherworld where pop icons are smothered with makeup buff pads. Slightly disconnected and ethereal but luring nonetheless. A rather mature sound in an unusual space from a quite unusual band. Strawberry Banana- that lost backtrack to the Abba song that Bjorn farted around with for years but never found the right lyrics for- another stake in the false heart of pop music, the jokes on those who thought Deerhoof could never make it as a pop band.
3w: Caroliner on Prozac
– Outlier

Repp, Corrina – “It’s Only the Future ” – [Hush Records]

lombard   2/8/2005   A Library, CD

This is one of the most memorable releases I’ve heard in awhile. Corrina Repp (her parents named her after a Bob Dylan song) is from Portland, Oregon and has been playing music in various bands for 10 years. This was released in fall 2004. In style it’s similar to Cat Power, with its spare instrumentation and lovely female vocals. Very subtle piano, guitar, and slight electronic moments. This is mystical! (added 2-8-2005)

-Cynthia Lombard

Caine, Uri and La Gaia Scienza – “Love Fugue: Robert Schumann ” – [Winter and Winter]

lombard   2/8/2005   A Library, CD

From 2000. Treatises on love that blend elements of classical, jazz and poetry. It begins with male vocals and classical piano (track one), moves to dramatic strings and piano (track two) to spoken word and operatic (track three) to crazy drama with male throaty vocals that can rival the best metal performer (track four) to jazz-inspired with scat singing (track seven), along with some instrumental tracks glueing it all together. (added 2-8-05)

-Cynthia Lombard

Folk & Pop Sounds of Sumatra Vol. 2 [coll] – [Sublime Frequencies]

lombard   2/8/2005   CD, International

This is another release (pulled together in November 2004) from Sublime Frequencies that collects musical gems from around the world. Sumatra’s been in the news lately in the weeks following the December 2004 tsunami, so it’s nice to harken back to some less tragic times and hear Sumatran folk and pop music circa 1960s through the 1980s. It’s quite a range, from Indian-style pop to more sedate folk with simpler percussion. Strings, psych, crazy pop, and some nice female vocals. Track 11 is a pleasant folk song with male and female vocals. (added 2-8-2005)

-Cynthia Lombard

Sad World – ?Sad World I + II? – [Fax Records]

Hunter Gatherer   2/6/2005   A Library, CD

Sad World is two people: Dr. Atmo – real name Amir Abadi – a DJ/composer/architect and Ramin – full name Ramin Naghachian – both born in Iran and currently living in Frankfurt, Germany. (Fun fact: Dr. Atmo performed at and designed Frankfurt’s XS club.)

This 1996 release combines the first two Sad World CDs, orginially released in 8/1993 and 5/1994. We also have the third and last, Sad World III, in A. All three are on Pete Namlook‘s FAX label, one of the leading purveyors of ambient music.

Sad World is ambient electronica with a strong Middle Eastern influence. The track names evoke a time of greater glory for Muslims with great halls like Apadana, cities like Samarra, which was briefly the capitol of the Muslim world, and Cordoba, the center of Moorish culture in Spain.

The music on these CDs contains some relatively brief tracks of 5 and 10 minutes and one longer tracks of 20, 30, and 40 minutes. They contain synthesizer drones, interesting samples (voices from American broadcasts, choirs, talking, chanting, singing children), instruments like sitar and, I think, a didgeridoo, sometimes there are downtempo drum loops giving the hint of rhythm.

You can actively listen to these tracks and trace their slow development and changing textures, or you can just float along with it and enjoy the ride.
–Hunter Gatherer

Odean Pope “Almost Like Me” [Moers]

Thurston Hunger   2/3/2005   12-inch, Format, Jazz

1982 sounds like next week. Pope’s tenor pumps
nectar over Cornell Rochester’s passionate
percussion and Gerald Veasley’s force-to-be-
reckoned-with electric bass. You heard me,
electric…normally that sends a shiver in
one ear, down the spine, back up and out the
other ear…electric bass in jazz can sound
like a rubber tree in a cartoon. The range
and expression of the upright tower over its
cousin. But this is exceptional, Veasley is
nimble, from deep-fried rumble to lighter
than air harmonics. This release should get
some nice crossover on plenty of shows. At
times there’s a manic power that makes you
think of Japan’s Ruins. Besides a secret
tunnel to rock, there’s another big one to
funk. Still the thrill to the ride is Pope’s
sweet sax sermonizing, matched by his often
heart-stopping (and in some spots heart-
shattering) composition. Drums were recorded
a bit flat…but everything else soars. This
is a blessing from on high.

Phillip Ranelin/Wendrel Harrison “A Message from the Tribe” [Tribe Records]

Thurston Hunger   2/3/2005   12-inch, Format, Jazz

A hippy vibe with Black Pride coming from the flip side of
Motown Records. This album oozes “lanquidity” coasting from
note to note. I preferred the first side, guided by label
co-founder and trombonist, Phil Ranelin. He keeps bassist
Charles Eubanks popping, and then adds vocals from Jeamel
Lee on two tracks to pour a little Angela Davis gasoline
on the simmering warmth. By the time that side ends, he’s
built up a firecracker of a number with “How Do We End
All Of This Madness” on which he sings as well. Ranelin’s
trombone adds to the curvaceousness of this release, only a
few moments of Wendell Harrison’s sax spike up out of the
mellifluous melange. What holds this all together, and
maybe holds the spiking solos back, is the omnipresence of
electic piano. It’s just an instrument that fills, often
prettily, but rarely commands. It is more dominant, along
with some flute on the side that Harrison composed. Some
30 years later, Ranelin is still rolling, co-creating his
own label with artistic control back then showed a lot of
foresight and soulful sound.

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