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Xome/Boar [coll] – [Breaching Static]

Xome/Boar, Boar/Xome: it all depends on which version you get. Either way, hold on. Two sides from two of the most out there of electronic noise performers. Xome (Bob Scott or Bab Sato) has been around since 1989. Currently based out of Sacramento, Xome has earned his credentials, performing with so many big names in noise and other such things. His performances are vigorous and outrageous. He often sticks mics down his pants for feedback and other sounds. These tracks feel a bit more mature, tempered, even deeper in sound. Thoughtful, almost, but harsh sonic blasts. The last selections is noise with children’s toy advertisements.
Boar, based out of Dubuque, Iowa, is a solo act of epic proportions. Headbanger noise? Harsh noise, higher pitched than Xome, in many cases. Rapid fire wall of sound screams and creams. Cathartic with poison. Ouch for sure with smiles.
The gloriousness of NOISE is showcased by these two dynamic artists. Not for the weak of heart.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 10:23 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Nuit Noire – “Inner Light” – [Seed Stock Records]

    innerlight

    Founded in 1997, Nuit Noire is Tenebras, AKA Mallory Julia, who is from Tolouse, France. He comes out of the Black Metal scene, but his band is not so easy to categorize. He has been known to refer to his music as “blasting faerical punk,” and indeed, despite the many Black Metal tropes at work, it’s clearly not church-burning music. It’s a bit too lightweight. Throughout this 2015 LP I was asking myself “Wait, is it Black Metal? Is it Death Rock? Is it Post-Punk? Shoegaze?” What good are these genre names, really? The group’s main themes are fairies, folklore and forests, and the dark/romantic dynamic of the music reflects that. Some screeching and some dramatic wailing. Is it too sensitive to be metal? How seriously are we supposed to take it? Anyway, I think a certain Alcest owes Mr. Tenebras a cut.

    Julia is joined by his brother Andy on drums, who has played with a lot of important French Black Metal projects including Celestia, Peste Noire, Mutiilation and Darvulia. This whole thing was actually recorded back in 2003, and some songs have appeared elsewhere in other versions. According to Tenebras, a disagreement between the siblings delayed the album’s release for twelve years. These cuts are really spectacular, though. So out-of-the-box. A little Joy Division meets Ulver, Immortal, Forgotten Woods, Belketre, Rudimentary Peni, Antischism. The good kind of “Post-Metal” buzz.

  • Reviewed by Lord Gravestench on April 26, 2017 at 6:20 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • White Screen, The – “White Screen, The” – [Garzen Records]

    GARZEN004LP_CU

    The White Screen is an Israeli rock trio consisting of Gilbert Broid (vocalist), Gabriel Broid (guitar) and Stav Ben Shahar (drums). They are known for their weird, Dadaist live performances and are depicted on the back of the sleeve. The Broids are cousins.

    The White Screen sounds like no-wave, glam rock, and surf rock. A bit cabaret, too- sultry, or maybe stupefied. In their own words: “Their lyrics are very political and criticize the whole system and leadership in Israel. Very not political correct”. Politics, religion, society, and the military all get a jab. Some are humorous, while others are more dour (“black is she, the white bird”).

    The A side is the stronger of the two, but a special mention is owed to track 10 (“Pin ve Pot”), which has absurd lyrics and an intriguing drum riff.

    Long live the White Screen.

    No FCCs.

  • Reviewed by Rat King on April 26, 2017 at 6:10 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Radio Cliff Hangers [coll] – [Radiola]

    Damsels in distress, dastardly villains, theme songs, Ovaltine ads, racism, spies, organs, weather sound effects, and over acting. What’s going to happen next? Tune in to find out.
    - Billie Joe Tolliver

  • Reviewed by billiejoe on April 26, 2017 at 2:07 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Black Scorpio Underground, The – “Necrochasm” – [Prison Tatt Records]

    Black(ened) noise metal from LA. Been together for more than ten years. Members include: Thee Sluglord, MS 45, and Thulsa Doom. You will hear: Dialog under crunchy noise metal. Crashing war-like bangs. Echoing hollow vibrations. Monster roars. Demon screams. Sermon on hell.
    – Billie Joe Tolliver

  • Reviewed by billiejoe on April 26, 2017 at 1:53 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Marhaug, Lasse / Sult – “Harpoon” – [Pica Disk]

    sult

    The source material for these two side-long tracks was first recorded by Sult, an acoustic improv trio known for amplifying the micro-tonal sounds of their instruments. Sult is Havard Skaset on guitar, Jacob Felix Heule on percussion, and Guro Skumsnes Moe on the contrabass. The sounds were then destructed, chopped, blended, and reconstructed by Norwegian sound artist Lasse Marhuag.

    Have your Dramamine handy for this one. A disorienting jumble of grinding metallic sounds, like a rusty, salt-soaked steel ship battered by waves, careening rudderless through a maelstrom, helpless against forces of nature infinitely more powerful than it. Dense layers of whirring, wheezing, and sputtering. Pantry shelves collapsing, sending pots, pans, and cans tumbling, crashing against floor and walls. A few fleeting moments of repetitive bass thumps on the end of side A provide the only solid footing in the entire album, and leave you desperate for more.

  • Reviewed by Louie Caliente on April 16, 2017 at 3:21 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Brahms / Heifetz / Reiner – “Violin Concerto In D, Op. 77″ – [RCA Victor/ BMG]

    bh2R-2818811-1302459943

    The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, was composed by Johannes Brahms in 1878 and dedicated to his friend, the violinist Joseph Joachim. It is Brahms’s only violin concerto, and, according to Joachim, one of the four great German violin concerti.

  • Reviewed by Hemroid The Leader on April 6, 2017 at 12:28 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,Classical
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  • Brahms – “Complete Quartets For Piano & Strings Vol. 2″ – [Capitol Records]

    bhR-6882147-1428678818-6892

    The Piano Quartet in A major, Op. 26 by Johannes Brahms, for piano, violin, viola and cello. It was completed in 1861 and received its premiere in November 1863 by the Hellmesberger Quartet with the composer playing the piano part.
    This quartet is long and shows the influence of Schubert. When performed badly it is quite interminable. None of that here, Victor Allen at the piano with members of the Hollywood String Quartet, Felix Slatkin- violin, Alvin Dinkin- viola, Eleanor Allen- cello.

  • Reviewed by Hemroid The Leader on April 6, 2017 at 10:40 am
  • Filed as 12-inch,Classical
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  • Burzum – “Burzum/Aske” – [Back on Black]

    burzum-aske-lp

    “Isn’t he racist” Yes, and a confessed murderer too (of an arguably better musician), and an arsonist of cultural heritage sites, and the holder of all manner of extremely bizarre views besides. Take an honest look at the stone in your own eye, thou hypocrite, and you may find out you’re not doing so hot yourself. Anyway, I think it’s safe to say all honkies are “racist” nowadays, whether we like it or not: that is at least so far as the, ahem, cultural hegemony is concerned.

    Recorded in 1992 by one man, under a full moon, at the Grieg concert hall’s studio (where Emperor also made albums), and originally released on future victim and Mayhem founder Euronymous’ Deathlike Silence Productions, Burzum’s debut didn’t invent Black Metal but it did pioneer the style most often associated with the genre: call it the ‘dark forest’ sound. Its inhuman vocalizations, sickly, buzzing guitar tone, flurried drumming and mournful atmosphere were very influential on the development of the ‘raw’ and ‘depressive’ scenes: see Forgotten Woods, Ildjarn, Ulver and Mutiilation for more information. Contrary to what you may have read on any number of clickbait websites, there’s little here that could be called political content. The lyrics are adolescent (nineteen-year-old) fantasies of violence and power. There are also settings of an ancient Sumerian invocation (A2) and a spell intended to destroy the world (A3). If you want my opinion (and you do, right?), Dungeons and Dragons and Tolkien (‘Burzum’ is Black Speech for ‘darkness’) are more important thematic influences here than Wiligut. This Back on Black reissue also includes the tracks from 1993′s ‘Aske’ (‘Ashes’) EP on the D side. Technically it’s a reissue of the compiled ‘Burzum’/'Aske’ release on Misanthropy Records from 1995. B1 and C2 are ambient and B3 and D2 are instrumental guitar tracks.

    The truth is, it doesn’t really matter how you or I may feel about Varg Vikernes or Burzum now, because the movement he started that night at Fantoft Stave has achieved its own momentum, and we will win :-)

  • Reviewed by Lord Gravestench on March 29, 2017 at 2:15 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Necrot – “Labyrinth, The” – [Tankcrimes]

    necrotch

    Necrot! The destiny of this Oakland Death Metal band has been intertwined with KFJC’s ever since Number Six acquired a copy of the first demo back at Deadfest 2012. You can find evidence on Live From The Devil’s Triangle Volume 16 of that same year’s Firebunker live mic session. Just in time for their scheduled second appearance on our airwaves comes this LP, mastered by Dissector of Ghoul, which compiles all three demo tapes released thus far. It’s true that our library has two of the tapes already but look a squirrel.

    For their first two tapes (A1-B1), both released 2012, Necrot was the duo of cadaverous Italian growler/guitarist Luca Indrio (Acephalix, Vastum, Lawless) and San Jose local Chad Gailey (Bruxers, Caffa, Vastum, Rude, Atrament) on the hammers. In 2014 their third release (B2-B4) brought in Sonny Reinhardt (Saviours) to play lead guitar, with Indrio sticking to bass. It’s probably easier to play live with three members.

    In their search for the dankest chainsaw riffs yet unheard, Necrot embrace a stripped-down, sometimes grooving sound, kind of raw in a way that approximates Gothenberg Death Metal superheroes like Dismember and At The Gates, cept in their young daze before they all went to shit. It’s NOT sloppy, but it does have a studied looseness and a haphazard race-for-the-end quality that will appeal to fans of Punk. They might be less excited about dying than some bands. That said, it’s Death Metal through and through, baby. All hail.

  • Reviewed by Lord Gravestench on March 27, 2017 at 11:08 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Fella, James – “Inactive Parts” – [Weird Machine / Gilgongo]

    Prolific artist from Arizona. Sounds like tones, knocking, buzzing, and noise crunch.
    This album was made this year and is from a 2014 art installation that explored sounds and printmaking. What you hear are acoustic sounds played back in amplified volume. The title, “Inactive Parts” refers to the amount of time metal plates used for making records sit before being discarded if not used.
    – Billie Joe Tolliver

  • Reviewed by billiejoe on March 22, 2017 at 2:56 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • De Brauw, Trevor – “Uptown” – [Flenser]

    Solo debut from the guitarist from Pelican. Also associated with RLYR and Chord. From Chicago. Sounds like humming buzzing tones from a chord organ with occasional acoustic and electric guitar, keyboard, vocals, and cat collar. Moody. Layered. Dramatic. Chill. This is one of my favorite kinds of rock n roll. Vocal on track 3. Spacey basey on track 4.
    – Billie Joe Tolliver

  • Reviewed by billiejoe on March 22, 2017 at 2:54 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Cale, John – “Academy In Peril, The” – [Edsel Records]

    cale

    This mostly instrumental album (1972) was Cale’s second solo effort, and it’s a transitional work in that he had been writing songs for a while–”Vintage Violence” was his previous solo record and that one was all songs–but he was not ready to leave behind the 1960′s avant-garde instrumental sounds he had been known for before the Velvet Underground came along. So there is some of that here. Cale was also classically trained on viola and piano, and that’s another influence that plays a big part on this record. There are three nice, medium-length piano pieces, and The Royal Philharmonic appears on an 8-minute orchestral suite on Side 2 and then joins Cale on the final track. There are a few oddball tracks: “The Philosopher” is all slide guitar, trumpet, and junk percussion; “King Harry” has actual lyrics but Cale delivers them in a creepy whisper; and there is a track on Side 1 that features Legs Larry Smith (of the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band) giving instructions to someone at a television studio with Cale’s overdubbed violas underneath. Ron Wood appears to be on this record someplace. I wouldn’t call every track strong, but if you’re a Cale fan, or even just curious about him, you’ll find some things to like here.

  • Reviewed by Max Level on March 21, 2017 at 9:08 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,B Library
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  • Kleistwahr – “Music For Zeitgeist Fighters” – [Nashazphone]

    NP023LP_CU

    Kleistwahr is the solo electronic project of Gary Mundy, of the legendary industrial/power electronics band Ramleh; his work under this name dates back to a pair of Broken Flag cassette releases from 1983. Mundy has returned to this project in recent years to create a series of intensely beautiful noise records that share a common theme of modern despair, including 2014′s The World Is Not My Home, 2016′s Over Your Heads Forever, and now this 2017 LP from Cairo’s Nashazphone label.

    Music for Zeitgeist Fighters holds two sidelong tracks, “Music For Dead Dreams” (T1) and “Music For Fucked Films” (T2), composed from relentless guitar feedback, ghostly voices straining to be heard through the distortion, hazy piano melodies, droning organ, and blistering noise. Blasts of harshness coexist with tragic beauty in a way that is so effortless and so authentic that it is immediately clear that this is work of a master. Philip Best wrote of this record: “Really don’t want to ruin the fun and generally I’m up for anything but this fucking shit cannot go on, can it?” In these deeply fucked times, music this blazingly powerful stirs the will to keep fighting.

  • Reviewed by lexi glass on March 21, 2017 at 5:56 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

    Holy crapola. Power punk is alive and well, thank the gods. My neck still has a kink in it from flipping my head around so much to this album by the Uranium Club (a.k.a. Minneapolis Uranium Club). Eight cuts of right on, 21st century nihilist punk songs filled with snark and futility due to the world’s current situation. Smart, young dude intelligent lyrics about god, earth destruction, messed up relationships: we are living the dream. May I state my references/what I hear when playing this for the fifth time: early fast Buzzcocks, early Devo, Steve Albini/Big Black, Gene Wilder Willie Wonka. Great guitar work. Strong bass lines. Powerful straight ahead drumming. Three of the four guys take on vocals. Track one is spoken word “ad” about the band. Track eight is a quick instrumental. Play it LOUD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:16 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:03 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Der Plan – “Japlan” – [Bureau B.]

    Der Plan Der Plan Der Plan. Du bist wunderbar. Considered to be the originators of Neue Deutsche Welle, Der Plan, from Dusseldorf, began in 1979 as more of an industrial band but moved into the electronic beats that make them famous. They incorporate puppets, masks, wild costumes, home made sets, all looking like a kindergarten class taking on “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”, along with the angular, electronic driven “simplistic” synth sounds. In 1984, they made a video and LP called “Japlan” which led to a successful tour of Japan. The album did very well there but was not released in Germany. Until 2013.
    The album is 21 songs of angular, electronic, German, synth goofiness. Songs about space travel, pizza, insects, German three masted boats: you name it, it’s here. Vocals are that kind of droney, mid to low register kind of “I don’t care I’m just too bored” sensibility. Superb. And just imagine what it would have looked like on stage.Get ready to anti-dance.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 9:00 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Beethoven – “Sonata No. 9 In a Minor, No. 6 In a Major” – [Epic Records]

    kreutzer

    The Kreutzer Sonata is very demanding. It is emotionally varied, technically difficult, and long (performances can last 40 minutes.

  • Reviewed by Hemroid The Leader on March 15, 2017 at 1:46 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,Classical
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  • Beethoven – “Trios: In G, Op. 9, No. 1 / In C Minor, Op. 9, No.” – [RCA Victor/ BMG]

    trioop9

    Composed 1797-8, published in Vienna 1799. At the time of publication, Beethoven thought these were his best works. The musicologist Gerald Abraham has remarked that in terms of their style and aesthetic value the string trios of Op. 9 rank with Beethoven’s first string quartets which ousted the trios from the concert halls.

  • Reviewed by Hemroid The Leader on March 15, 2017 at 1:30 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,Classical
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  • Beethoven – “String Quartet No. 15 In a Minor, Op. 132″ – [Philips]

    phs900182

    Beethoven’s late quartets were written in failing health in April 1825. Considered among the greatest works of all time, Beethoven composed these in almost total deafness. In his words, B2 is his “Holy song of thanks (‘Heiliger Dankgesang’) to the divinity, from one made well.”
    TS Eliot wrote the Four Quartets with a copy on the turntable, saying:

    I find it quite inexhaustible to study. There is a sort of heavenly or at least more than human gaiety about some of his later things which one imagines might come to oneself as the fruit of reconciliation and relief after immense suffering; I should like to get something of that into verse before I die.

  • Reviewed by Hemroid The Leader on March 15, 2017 at 10:57 am
  • Filed as 12-inch,Classical
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