About KFJC
Program Schedule
Specials and Events
Donations and Swag
  Netcast
Music and Playlists
Broadcast Archives
KFJC Music Reviews
  KFJC 89.7 FM
 
Library
  • A Library (6,190)
  • B Library (29)
  • Blues (82)
  • Classical (32)
  • Comedy (14)
  • Country (153)
  • Hip Hop (224)
  • International (385)
  • Jazz (994)
  • Reggae (124)
  • Soul (110)
  • Soundtrack (106)
  • Format
  • 10-inch (82)
  • 12-inch (2,253)
  • 7-inch (558)
  • Cassette (208)
  • CD (4,985)
  • DVD (2)
  • Reviewers
  • aarbor (31)
  • abacus (452)
  • aek (1)
  • angel (10)
  • Ann Arbor (3)
  • Anthony Fremont (5)
  • anthony fremont (10)
  • Apollo (19)
  • Arcanum (31)
  • Art Crimes (11)
  • ArtCrimes (115)
  • Austin Space (3)
  • Belladonna (133)
  • billiejoe (203)
  • BrotherGoatCult (2)
  • cadilliac margarita (28)
  • Chesus (1)
  • cinder (362)
  • cinderaura (11)
  • Cousin Mary (634)
  • crim (1)
  • cujo (99)
  • Dangerous Dan (2)
  • darkhelmet (1)
  • Daryl Licht (62)
  • David Richoux (55)
  • David Richoux (2)
  • Dianthus (43)
  • dirty frank (1)
  • domitype (18)
  • dylantante (1)
  • fatsterminal (2)
  • felix (10)
  • fox (10)
  • Fucker (89)
  • Funkminsta Fulla (10)
  • gravity (1)
  • gretaclue (26)
  • Grizzly Adam (87)
  • HackersMuse (4)
  • Hawkeye Joe (2)
  • Hemroid The Leader (169)
  • honeybear (33)
  • human (2)
  • humana (925)
  • Hunter Gatherer (105)
  • incognito (90)
  • Jack Diamond (4)
  • jack soil (30)
  • jacksoil (16)
  • japanic (3)
  • Jawbone (45)
  • Jim Hunter (1)
  • johnnydarko (9)
  • jordan (7)
  • Kai Sync (80)
  • kato (1)
  • kev (1)
  • Krzton Drda (14)
  • Lady Labyrinth (4)
  • Laethaka (31)
  • leothelion (3)
  • lexi glass (86)
  • lillygreenworks (2)
  • lola (1)
  • lombard (172)
  • Lord Gravestench (3)
  • Louie Caliente (64)
  • loun (66)
  • Mac (9)
  • magic jack (4)
  • mann (20)
  • Marlena Poliatevska (4)
  • Max Level (575)
  • mickeyslim (176)
  • milo (7)
  • mitch (57)
  • monster (5)
  • Morada (29)
  • morris (3)
  • MorrisMinor (4)
  • mouthbreather (56)
  • Mr. Lucky (20)
  • mrpantsfancy (7)
  • MSTiZA (85)
  • Muad'Dib (19)
  • Naysayer (290)
  • nic (16)
  • niles (1)
  • Nozmo King (6)
  • Numa (29)
  • Number 6 (28)
  • olmec (8)
  • ophelia necro (170)
  • outlier (128)
  • pArcel pOst (14)
  • Peter Doubt (2)
  • Phil Phactor (22)
  • PopeDope (4)
  • ralph (2)
  • Rarus Avis (9)
  • rasbabo (17)
  • Rat King (19)
  • rduck (1)
  • RobtEmmett (1)
  • Rocket J. Squirrel (1)
  • Rococo (153)
  • Roland Blunt (42)
  • sailordave (24)
  • SAL 9000 (2)
  • SAL9000 (12)
  • Sally Goodin (2)
  • scrub (1)
  • selector (25)
  • shiroi (13)
  • Sir Cumference (29)
  • sluggo (13)
  • socialnorm (1)
  • stingray (29)
  • Studebaker Hawk (41)
  • surferrosa (158)
  • tbag (2)
  • The Mole (8)
  • Thee Opinataur (30)
  • thewindow (11)
  • Thurston Hunger (1379)
  • tiny (1)
  • Train Wreck (8)
  • Tyke (3)
  • victoria west (36)
  • WCMurphy19 (2)
  • Zoltan (6)
  • Archives
      KFJC On-Line Reviews
    What KFJC has added to their library and why...

    Usiende Ukalale: Omutibo From Rural Kenya [coll] – [Mississippi Records]

    Omutibo is a style of Kenyan folk music that combines storytelling with intensely rhythmic fingerpicking guitar. It was developed by guitarist George Mukabi in the early 1950s, who took inspiration from the traditional nyatiti lyre and sukuti drum. The style proved to be wildly popular, and Mukabi sold hundreds of thousands of records throughout East and Central Africa. Over 50 years later, Cyrus Moussavi (Raw Music International) traveled to Kenya to visit many of the original musicians and record them in their homes. While George Mukabi himself is not featured here (he passed in 1963 at the age of 33), we do hear music from his son Johnstone. Joyous, life-affirming songs, and an essential document.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on April 18, 2018 at 6:16 am
  • Filed as 12-inch,International
  • Comment on this review
  • Parker, Evan / Lazro, Daunik / McPhee, Joe – “Seven Pieces Live At Willisau 1995” – [Clean Feed]


    Clean Feed brings the goods once again with this document of a 1995 meeting of three titans of the modern saxophone. From the opening long-held tones of “Echoes of Memory,” it’s clear that this is going to be a conversation, not a shouting match. These guys know how to play, but they also know how to listen. Moments reminiscent of a Bach fugue evolve effortlessly into moments of unbridled free play. This recording has been remastered from cassette, and the tape hiss and occasional cough really help in the feeling of being there. The track “Florid” (T4) is solo Evan Parker, and it is one of his classic circular-breathing ascending-to-heaven epics. Worth the price of admission all by itself. The last track ends with extended rhythmic clapping.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on April 11, 2018 at 7:07 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Orimo, Sabu – “Wind Songs” – [Siwa]

    R-2080100-1312677780.jpeg
    Solo improvisations for shakahuchi (a Japanese flute). Sparse, mysterious, utterly captivating. Check out the other releases on Siwa in our library

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on March 28, 2018 at 5:59 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Cambien, Jonas Trio – “Zoology of The Future, a” – [Clean Feed]

    jonascambientrio_azoologyofthefuture_ga

    Modern, quirky, jazz miniatures from this trio of Europeans. It’s the very opposite of a skronk-fest, as all the tracks are composed (at least in part), and most clock at under five minutes. The compositions are highly rhythmic, with the melodic material hinting at all kinds of things from modern classical to lounge jazz. A polite, measured treat.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on March 14, 2018 at 7:25 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Kim, Roger – “Portrait Maker” – [Self Produced]

    tumblr_okbu96xa5K1w4omkbo3_540

    Achingly gorgeous work from local talent Roger Kim. Delicate melodies lushly arranged for an ensemble of strings, woodwinds, voice, guitar, and piano create a fairy-tale atmosphere. Drift off into a strange and wonderful new world…

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on March 6, 2018 at 9:57 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Rich, Robert – “Biode, The” – [Soundscape Productions]

    a1142355539_16

    High priest of the chill-out room Robert Rich returns with this satisfying collection of slithering, shimmering, seething electronic ambience. The beats range from absent to gently propulsive, but you probably won’t be tempted out of your bean bag chair. Eastern-tinged melodies rise up out of the electronic murk and then fall again. On first listen, some of the tracks can sound rather simple, but there’s lots of hidden detail for the patient listener.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on February 28, 2018 at 6:36 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • 1 comment
  • HMS – “Tetrad” – [Astral Spirits]


    Yes, it’s another genre-defying release from the folks at Astral Spirits. Climb aboard the HMS Tetrad! You’ll find delicate drumwork, disembodied violin, and other things too, but mostly there is just the deep, dark vastness of the sea. These tense and drony soundscapes bring to mind a darker, fuzzed-out version of The Necks, and that’s high praise as far as I’m concerned. Retriever (T2) is the highlight.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on February 14, 2018 at 2:04 pm
  • Filed as A Library,Cassette
  • Comments Off on HMS – “Tetrad” – [Astral Spirits]
  • Similar Fashion – “Portrait of” – [Self Produced]

    a0358072816_16

    Dancey, sunny, art-pop from this L.A.-based quartet led by Logan Hone, whose solo album recently sailed through Current. There’s a west African feel to a lot of these tracks, and an Arthur Russell feel as well. The pop song format gets turned upside down and inside out and spiked with ??some delicious bits of free improvisation, but the groove is never far away. Logan Hone’s earnestly weird lyrics evoke the joy of living in California and the joy of living in general. If this doesn’t put a smile on your face, there’s probably something wrong with you.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on February 14, 2018 at 2:03 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comments Off on Similar Fashion – “Portrait of” – [Self Produced]
  • Computer – “Internet” – [Skrot Up]

    This is an album called ‘Internet’ by an outfit calling themselves ‘Computer,’ and well it sounds exactly like you think it would. Which is to say, cliched synth squiggles, slapdash Youtube sampling, text-to-speech, wrong-speed experiments, gratuitous power chords, all chopped up and run through Ableton by a pair of millennials on an Adderall/weed bender. Another reviewer writes: “just a big dump of digital trash that cannot be avoided.”

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on January 31, 2018 at 7:14 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • 1 comment
  • Gerowitz, Joshua – “Solano Canyon” – [Pfmentum]

    This is the debut album from Socal-based guitarist Joshua Gerowitz, and it’s exceedingly hard to pin down. The lead-off track seems simple enough, with the horns blowing over a swinging, dad-jazz vamp, when all of a sudden Gerowitz launches a fuzzed-out attack and blows things wide open. The Hamburger Isand tracks (T2, T5, T7) are noisy, vocal-led drone improvisations and available in a variety of track lengths for your programming convenience. Morning Landscape Illusion (T4) is a bluesy dirge with lots of filigreed horn work that slowly builds in intensity. Last track is a lonely, looper-ed, Bill Frisell-style send off.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on January 16, 2018 at 9:10 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comments Off on Gerowitz, Joshua – “Solano Canyon” – [Pfmentum]
  • Pek, Jakob – “Acoustic Medicine” – [Self Produced]



    Minimal, hippy-dippy, solo guitar explorations courtesy of local artist Jakob Pek, who makes up one-half of improv duo Dunkelpek (with percussionist Nava Dunkelman). While that group can get pretty far out at times, for this project Jakob keeps things simple and contemplative. Tracks 1 and 3 are fingerstyle jams, while tracks 2 and 4 make use of long held tones, made with a violin bow as well as perhaps an E-bow, a signal generator, and Tibetan singing bowls. Track opens with some prayer bells and ends up being a combination of the two approaches. Slow down and take it in.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on December 13, 2017 at 6:57 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Ensemble, Et Al. – “Slow Reveal, The” – [Imaginator Records]



    Don’t mention the Tortoise in the room. Four academically-minded percussionists get together with John McEntire and record a p*st-rock album. Vibraphones, glockenspiels, dense interlocking rhythms, drums that crash in half way through, it’s all here. The first four minutes of??Minbalism (T8) sees the boys putting their chops to good use setting up an entrancing, polyrhythmic, overtone-laden drone. Once the drums come on, it gets a bit corny, but that’s just me (maybe?). Solid mallet vibes, if a little tame. Dive in!

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on November 29, 2017 at 8:03 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Hearts & Minds – “Hearts and Minds” – [Astral Spirits]

    a2525909611_16
    Man oh man, does free jazz get more fun than this? I don’t think so. Coming out of Chicago and released on Austin-based cassette label Astral Spirits (“new wave of heavy free jazz”), Hearts and Minds is a trio composed of bass clarinetist Jason Stein (fun fact: Amy Schumer’s brother), keyboardist Paul Giallorenzo, and drummer Frank Rosaly. Giallorenzo often sounds like two players in one, playing bass lines with his left hand while doubling the melody with the right. Other times he’s putting down smooth chords, getting noisy (a la the recent Thollem/Mazurek record), or spinning out tender melodies (check the solo on Irresolute). Jason Stein is the star of the show. A master on the bass clarinet, he can do all the free jazz tricks???clicking sounds, dissonant overtones, rapid-fire passages, circular breathing???but he’s also always melodic and always swinging. On Three for One, he lays down some klezmer-esque wailing over a slinky Sun Ra groove and then leads you down into a dark underworld that slowly fractures and expands before your eyes (ears?). Almost overshadowed in all of this is superstar drummer Frank Rosaly, never flashy, but pushing and pulling behind the scenes and always keeping it groovy. Great, great stuff that will appeal to fans of both traditional and free jazz, as well as prog, funk, noise, +++.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on November 7, 2017 at 10:26 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Shipp, Matthew Quartet – “Not Bound” – [Fortune Records]

    cover_0124-292x290

    Matthew Shipp adds wind player Daniel Carter to his long-time trio composed of Michael Bisio on bass and Whit Dickey on drums. The group works with an easy familiarity, favoring patient exploration over fast-paced fireworks. The opener soul secrets (T1) sets the tone for the album: a moody, modal composition which sees the bandmembers anticipating each others moves and effortlessly passing motifs around. If you associate Shipp with thundering left-hand chords, you’ll find a different side of him here. The track is (T2) opens with two minutes of drums over a walking bass line followed by spare, angular trumpet lines from Carter that recall middle-period Miles Davis. The group generates the most heat on totality (T4), which is also, to my mind, the most satisfying. A solid outing.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on November 1, 2017 at 7:04 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Converse, Bill – “Shape of Things to Come, The” – [Dark Entries]

    de158-bill-converse-cover

    Bill Converse loves Detroit techno and he doesn???t care who knows it. Seven tracks of analog bliss spread across four sides of vinyl, this album is a sonic tribute to the Midwest warehouse raves of his youth. Recorded with no overdubs using an array of mostly vintage hardware, this album pulsates with the urgency of the dancefloor. The full range of the 303 is on display here, from gently gurgling basslines to squelch freakouts to psychedelic comedowns. Each track reveals a hidden beauty as it evolves, no doubt the result of many hours of solitary knob twiddling. Timeless body music. PLAY LOUD.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on October 11, 2017 at 1:58 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Centazzo, Andrea/ Sakata, Akira/ Fujiwara, Kiyoto – “Bridges” – [Ictus]

    162fr

    Reeds/drums/bass exploration recorded in Milan in 2012. Although Sakata has worked with both Bill Laswell and DJ Krush, he stays well within the free jazz idiom herm, with a soulful, searching sound that recalls both Ornette Coleman and Steve Lacy. What really makes this album special, however, is the near-telepathic communication among the band members, all the more remarkable given that this was their first meeting. The first track begins with the players quietly testing each other, but they quickly cohere around a common thread and move through a variety of spaces. The second track is quiet and contemplative, with Sakata switching to clarinet, Centazzo dazzling us with an array of bells and chimes, and Fujiwara drawing out tones with his bow. Track 3 picks up the pace again, and then on track 4, we’re in for a treat as Sakata puts down his horn and grunts and growls his way through a Damo Suzuki-esque dirge. The last track is based on Stella by Starlight and sees the drums and bass play it (relatively) straight while Sakata blows over the top. Overall, well worth your time if you’re into this sort of thing.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on October 4, 2017 at 6:12 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Conjoint – “Conjoint” – [KM 20]

    R-62080-1166447752.jpeg

    Purveyor of groovy ambience David Moufang (perhaps better known as Move D) adds live guitar and vibes to the mix and… nothing much happens. But perhaps that???s the point? The album meanders through the sleepy back alleys of dub, electronica, jazz, and trip-hop. Highlights include Tee Dum (T5) which marries Bill Evans harmonies to an exceedingly chilled electro beat and the beatless Boards-of-Canada-esque closer Concessions (T9).

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on October 2, 2017 at 8:04 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Hakobune – “Getsumei, Yamakage, Kouyou” – [Self Released]

    Tokyo-based Hakobune has put out dozens of albums over the years on a who’s who of boutique drone labels. On this self-released 3″ CD-R from 2011, he shows himself a master of the guitar-run-through-a-mess-of-delay-pedals technique. Three cosmic floating drones, useful for recovering from some harsh noise or just focusing the mind.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on August 30, 2017 at 7:29 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Animals & Giraffes – “July” – [Edgetone Records]

    4184

    being on top is a good hip opener – claudia la rocco’s voice is a quiet snarl: calm, measured, sometimes provocative, always defiant. – remember the way her legs spear and thrust – each track finds her accompanied by a different set of bay area musicians. – put the mountain in a box, put the box in a dumpster – rumblings and rattlings, abrasive synths, extended techniques galore, the sounds are sometimes with and sometime against, but always underneath. – your skin looks buttery and delicious – it’s la rocco’s voice that dominates, telling stories about ballet, the body, poisonous relationships, and sexual violence. – you don’t cry anymore when you’re sad – smack in the middle of the album, “public access” (T5) sees la rocca in conversation with saxophonist david boyce and the mood briefly relaxes. – do you want that kind of attention?

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on August 28, 2017 at 11:20 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • 1 comment
  • Thollem / Mazurek – “Blind Curves and Box Canyons” – [Relative Pitch Records]

    Trumpeter Rob Mazurek (Chicago Underground, Isotope 217) and electric pianist Thollem McDonas (Tsigoti, Estamos Ensemble) meet for the first time in Marfa and head for the outer limits. As might be expected from a pair of experienced improvisers with incredibly diverse interests, they hit a variety of spots along the way. It helps that Mazurek is packing a sampler, a modular synth, bells, and his prodigious voice in addition to his horn. Electric-era Miles is the obvious referent, but there are also Oval-style glitch experiments, modular synth workouts, free-folk psych freakouts, and even some “straight” free-improv. Of particular note are those moments when Mazurek’s shamanic chanting breaks through the squall, and the whole thing threatens to break itself apart. Noisy, messy, and joyous.

  • Reviewed by Phil Phactor on July 26, 2017 at 7:05 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review


  • Next Page »

     

     Copyright © 2018   KFJC 89.7 FM
    12345 S. El Monte Road   Los Altos Hills, California   94022   phones