About KFJC
Program Schedule
Specials and Events
Donations and Swag
  Netcast
Music and Playlists
Broadcast Archives
KFJC Music Reviews
  KFJC 89.7 FM
 
Library
Format
Reviewers
Archives
  KFJC On-Line Reviews
What KFJC has added to their library and why...

Baraki – “Colony Laspberry” – [Worm Interface]

Baraki: a Pashtun tribe, a village in Afghanistan, a village in Poland or Iran, a commune in Algeria, a Belgian insult for a slob.
This Baraki, wherever the name comes from, is an accomplished musician out of Kyoto. “Colony Laspberry” is his master class in many styles of electronic dance music, so well done that on a continuous listen, one wonders if this is many groups/projects instead of just one. It’s just one: Baraki.
Each track is a unique sound: “rock “n job” starts off like classic Japanese electronica pop from the 80′s/90′s. From there it takes off. We get IDM, drill ‘n bass, environmental ambient, rave pounding beats, freak out spinning electronic bouncy mumble, squelch. All the sounds are here. Wow wow wow. Head spinning yes please.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 14, 2017 at 12:03 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Orb, The – “Alpine” – [Kompakt Schallplatten]

    Does it get much more lovely than this? Maybe, but grasp this while you can. Three pieces of mood by the dynamic duo of Alex Paterson and Thomas Fehlmann, one piece – Dawn- selected as part of Kompact’s POP AMBIENT 2016. The stunning cover of the Matterhorn as double sets the mood for these three contemplative selections. “Alpine Morning” is a meandering electronic soundscape with backward tracked voices, like music for getting ready for a stroll in the great outdoors. “Alpine Evening” sets the beats, distorted sounds and even some squelched yodeling, for a dance club in Zermat, looking out on the famous natural attraction. “Alpine Dawn” starts out with cow or sheep bells, just what one would hear in the small farms surrounding the alpine fixture and then floats, twists and turns luxuriously – music for watching the sun rise? Or maybe it has nothing to do with the Matterhorn at all. Whatever, it’s gorgeous.
    Enjoy.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 13, 2017 at 11:31 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Fall, The – “Wise Ol’ Man” – [Cherry Red Records]

    It’s the 21st Century and The Fall still push forward. This 2016 EP features 2 new songs, the title track plus “All Leave Cancelled”, alternate takes plus remixes of several songs from 2015′s Sub-Lingual Tablet plus a rare live version of “No Xmas For John Quays” recorded in 2014.
    Impressive stuff. Visceral and tight instrumentation pounding forward and driving the repetition which never seems to feel redone. But Mark E. Smith. WOW! As we age our voices change, our manner along with it. Smith is still Smith but boy that voice. His classic shout not sing style of thick accented vocalizing has turned into mumbled spewing, garbled growls and some of the most frightening yowls, howls and old man scream shouts. What is beyond rage? That’s the sound. Amazing. Keep your kids away, but it is superb.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 5, 2017 at 11:17 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Oliveros, Pauline & American Voices – “St. George and The Dragon/In Memoriam Mr. Whitney” – [Mode]

    This early 1990′s recording of Oliveros comes during her deep listening period. Having gone to the Pomfret School in Connecticut on invitation from American Voices director Neely Bruce to lead a Deep Listening Training, Pauline took time to sit in the Chapel on the school grounds. It was known for it’s interesting acoustics which interested Oliveros. It was here that the two selections on this CD were formed. “St. George and the Dragon” is inspired by the statue of the same name which sits in the Chapel. Oliveros, playing accordion, evokes the spiritual battle between Saint and Dragon. Her long phrases, held out to mysterious length, reverberate within the Chapel. Listeners must take time with this 47 minute piece of meditation and beauty. “In Memoriam Mr. Whitney” is a heartbreaking work performed with American Voices. Accordion slowly plays while the vocalists, including Oliveros, call out the names of their loved ones who have passed on. The vocalists were encouraged to walk about the Chapel while saying the names. We hear their movement throughout. It is haunting to hear someone call out “Mamma”, “Grandad”, or nicknames of people. The intimacy along with Oliveros’ accordion are sometimes staggering in their quiet. A unique gift to our station.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 4, 2017 at 9:43 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Rothenberg, Ned/Feldman, Mark/Courvoisier, Sylvie – “In Cahoots” – [Clean Feed]

    Nine wonderful tracks of “free jazz” exploration tempered with continuous references and returns to meter, rhythm, repeated phrases of almost melodic quality. Sylvie Courvoisier on piano and Mark Feldman on violin had recently teamed up with Ikue Mori and Evan Parker for an album, so they come from experience and skill. Adding Ned Rothenberg on clarinet, alto saxophone, bass clarinet and shakuhachi makes for an interesting, challenging and lovely trio. No drums. Fascinating for a jazz album. And not missed in the least. These pieces explore so many dimensions capable with this list of instruments. For instance, when Feldman bows his violin it’s more shocking and head shaking than when he plucks, which would seem to make more sense. Songs start off and seem to explode, a rhythm played which begins to twist then loose itself in pure emotion. Pushing the definition of what is jazz, this collection of sounds positively broadens that idea.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 4, 2017 at 12:36 am
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Northern Soul Weekender [coll] – [Charly Records]

    Russ Winstanley is a DJ who spun Northern Soul sounds at Wigan Casino in England from the 1970′s to the early 80′s. This compilation, on the Charly label, is a collection of some of his favorites from his personal stash. Northern Soul was so termed as a way for the north England soccer fans visiting London, who loved the specific American soul sound, to find the specific American soul records they wanted at record stores. The sound is not Motown, but it is definitely Soul. It’s history in England is steeped in the Weekender when all night clubs played Northern Soul to the masses. 2am to 8am was when it fully kicked in and the Wigan Casino was one of the shrines of Northern Soul Weekender dancing and partying.
    The 27 tracks on this collection have some familiar names but more often than not some rare finds. The stomping beats from each number keep the listeners happy and moving, with tales of love lost, love wanted, love gained, love grown pale. Tight instrumentation and lush strong vocals carry us from one tune to the next, keeping up the rhythm and making the body move. All songs shine but some standouts for me are Loleatta Holloway singing “Mother of Shame”, Big Daddy Rogers’ “I’m a Big Man” and Ruby Winters testification on “Better”. The Sharpees’ “Take Me to Your Leader” has a bit of alien fun. Joe Tex has the strangest, most difficult tune, “Under Your Powerful Love”, where he describes a night in his hotel room intentionally listening to the couple in the next room. The woman finds herself in a situation she wants out of and is trying to convince the man to let her go, all while Joe listens in. Wrong.
    But everything is super danceable. Enjoy.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 3, 2017 at 10:38 pm
  • Filed as CD,Soul
  • Comment on this review
  • Cambridge Treasury of English Prose, The (Volume Three) [coll] – [Caedmon]

    In the 1950′s, Caedmon label put out a series of albums celebrating the Cambridge Treasury of English Prose. Here is vol. 4, Jane Austen to Emily and Charlotte Bronte with a lot of classic British white guy stuffed shirts in between. Criticism, essays, fiction, it’s all here. Straight ahead readings, wonderfully done, wonderfully 1950′s. All the stuff you should have read but really didn’t. Listen and relearn.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 11:37 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Orcutt, Bill & Chris Corsano – “Live At Various / Various Live” – [Palilalia]

    Master improvisers, Bill and Chris, take over and destroy.
    Did you see that movie “Unbroken” where the American soldiers are in a Japanese Concentration camp during WW II? And the masochistic guy in charge lines up all 125 American prisoners and forces them to punch the American soldier he is mad at/in love with, in the face. Just one after another. Again and again. That’s what listening to this feels like. The sound is pounding, sometimes feeling like there is no breathing room. Orcutt’s fret work is always amazing, like he is actually becoming the guitar to destroy it and transform it. Relentless. Like Corsano’s drum work. So overwhelmingly fast, changing patterns, rhythms, speeds. Like Orcutt. Each is the other, becoming the other. It’s often like violent transformation. There are quiet moments also, but even those are profoundly visceral.
    The four sides are taken from two cassettes from the 1990′s called “Live at Various” and “Various Live”. From Orcutt’s label which often gives little information. All you need to know is listen. And duck the punches.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 11:14 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Xome/Boar [coll] – [Breaching Static]

    Xome/Boar, Boar/Xome: it all depends on which version you get. Either way, hold on. Two sides from two of the most out there of electronic noise performers. Xome (Bob Scott or Bab Sato) has been around since 1989. Currently based out of Sacramento, Xome has earned his credentials, performing with so many big names in noise and other such things. His performances are vigorous and outrageous. He often sticks mics down his pants for feedback and other sounds. These tracks feel a bit more mature, tempered, even deeper in sound. Thoughtful, almost, but harsh sonic blasts. The last selections is noise with children’s toy advertisements.
    Boar, based out of Dubuque, Iowa, is a solo act of epic proportions. Headbanger noise? Harsh noise, higher pitched than Xome, in many cases. Rapid fire wall of sound screams and creams. Cathartic with poison. Ouch for sure with smiles.
    The gloriousness of NOISE is showcased by these two dynamic artists. Not for the weak of heart.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 10:23 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Longing For The Past [coll] – [Dust-To-Digital]

    Dust-To-Digital is a one of a kind label, focusing not only on quality collections but making sure packaging and information is as exquisite as the sounds. “Longing For the Past, The 78 RPM Era in Southeast Asia” continues this tradition. 78 recordings from the early 1900′s through the 1950′s, taken from Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam cover all ranges of music and styles from these countries at these times. Court music, wedding songs, instrumental pieces both solo and groups in all configurations, folk songs, known and unknown performers, village music, leaders chanting and on and on. So many sounds caught on 78′s and still intact to preserve a selection for us to hear on 4 CD’s. Initially this music was recorded merely as a means to sell Victrolas to a new market. You won’t buy it if there is nothing there to hear. European salesmen went out and recorded just about anything that moved. The selection in incredible. The accompanying book is a comprehensive review of how this started, who did it, where they went, the types of music and their history, notes on instrumentation and history of instruments and artists. Each song has three to five paragraphs of thorough explanation. Dive in, learn and enjoy.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 16, 2017 at 2:08 am
  • Filed as CD,International
  • Comment on this review
  • Hoosier Hot Shots – “Everybody Stomp” – [Proper Records]

    Hoosier Hot Shots ??? ???Everybody Stomp/Hot Lips??? ??? [Proper Records]

    The Hoosier Hot Shots were a four piece swing, jazz, corn pone, hillbilly country outfit from Indiana. Steeped in the tradition of vaudeville, the group took parts of the U.S. by storm with their weekly radio broadcasts, their stage presence, their prolific recording career and their continued appearance in Hollywood westerns. This collection, ???Everybody Stomp??? is a 4 CD set of 100 Hoosier Hot Shot delights. The guys were multi-instrumentalists, playing a variety of brass instruments as well as guitar, string bass (various), clarinet and some unique handmade instruments including the Zither and the Wabash Washboard. It consisted of a corrugated sheet metal washboard on a metal stand with various noisemakers attached, including bells and a multi-octave range of squeeze-type bicycle horns???. Also, slide whistles are in most numbers. The Hoosiers selected many standards and familiar songs of the time to cover with a jaunty, silly twist. Vocals include conversation between the musicians, with some of the singers using this high pitched kind of hillbilly accent. And don???t forget the penny whistles. Once beyond the goofiness, though, take a listen to the amazing musicianship between the members. It???s quite impressive. A fun addition, fitting many of the styles of our station???s shows.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 15, 2017 at 1:01 am
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • I’ve Got The Blues But I’m Too Damn Mean to Cry [coll] – [JSP Records]

    WOW. 4 CD’s. 103 tracks of protest in early American blues and gospel. Time period: 1910′s to the late 1930′s. We know the sound. No need to restate. So many artists, some well known and others obscure. Solos, choirs, groups, bands. But this is music of protest, some stated blatantly, others sung with humor, many layered with symbols and meaning to hide the target. These are songs, angry songs, desperate songs about abusive and oppressive conditions created and maintained by the white population relentlessly directed toward the black population. Despicable working conditions, police brutality, forced labor, prison horror. Continuous abuse and exploitation of one group of people by another. The variety of reactions to this oppression are as varied as the artists performing the songs. From thoughts of suicide to attacking and killing “Mr. Charlie”, from looking for the fabled promised land to all out revolution. The conditions and situations today of mistreatment and persecution are frighteningly and disgustingly no different then they were 100 years ago. These are essential tracks to play. Utilize this superb collection.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 14, 2017 at 11:14 pm
  • Filed as Blues,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Mezzetin – “Odd Scene” – [Kinda Is Records]

    Mezzetin still is a mystery. Who is He/They? Where from? Where is the label from? Possibly a one man project. “Odd Scene” might be Mezzetin’s 3rd release. It’s all great outsider rock. One of the more distinctive voices around, still off-keyish and repetitive. Lyrics of love and memories and lost things. Mezzetin is diving into more experiments in sound this time, which makes it all the more interesting. Jangly guitars abound, still off. Infantile drumming, but in a good way. Track 9, “Mingling Haus” is 4 minutes of one note strummed on the guitar with wank drums and no vocals. If this was being done by a female Japanese noise performance artist, we would all be losing our shit. He’s not that. You still should be losing your shit.
    PLAY THIS!!!! Pick of the week.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 14, 2017 at 6:14 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Squarepusher – “Go Plastic” – [Warp Records Ltd]

    Holy f..in sh#t! Trying to find my head to reattach to my body after listening to this one. I feel like I should go smoke a cig or get electro shocked. Tom Jenkinson, aka Squarepusher, is a major player in IDM/EDM/whatever. I don’t need to tell you. He’s brilliant. And so is this album from 2001. It marked a change for him, a move away from the use of actual instruments and an experiment with digital, all digital. No computers on this album, though. It’s hardware: it’s samplers, sequencers, synthesizers and digital effects processors. All put to their amazing 2001 use. Many pieces are FAST: sounds reverberate back and forth and through so fast you would never be able to catch them. But the few “slow” pieces are equally sonically exciting. Effects come and go and then the drill and bass starts. Yes Yes Yes! Oh hell yes!

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 7:10 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Crow Crash Radio – “Live In The Trees” – [Self Released]

    Crow Crash Radio are a Bay area group that combine extended psychedelic jams with surf influences and drone. With Mark Pino on drums, Andrew Joron on theremin and Brian Strang on guitar, these musicians create a soundscape that is hypnotic and repetitive in a good way. Pino’s constant beats guide the listener while Strang puts down layers of guitar sound, filled out by Joron’s theremin drone and warble. An exceptional take on a unique mixing of styles, going to show there is always a new way to interpret genres.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 3:45 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Callier, Terry – “Live At Mother Blues 1964″ – [Premonition Records]

    An exceptional talent, frighteningly underrepresented in our library, Terry Callier was a prolific musician and singer, performing blues, soul and folk songs. This 1964 recording live at Chicago’s Mother Blues folk club, offers an intimate performance of Callier, singing eight quiet yet moving folk tunes accompanied by his guitar playing and two acoustic bass players. The moment he starts to sing the audience goes quiet, except for the random plate or cup being moved. His voice is rich and powerful with so much emotion. It kind of makes you melt. It’s like loneliness and sex and strength and pain and kindness and sadness all wrapped up into one. Folk singers were true story tellers and Callier is right up there with the best, weaving his tales with assuredness and power. Your knees will buckle.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 3:27 pm
  • Filed as Blues,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

    Holy crapola. Power punk is alive and well, thank the gods. My neck still has a kink in it from flipping my head around so much to this album by the Uranium Club (a.k.a. Minneapolis Uranium Club). Eight cuts of right on, 21st century nihilist punk songs filled with snark and futility due to the world’s current situation. Smart, young dude intelligent lyrics about god, earth destruction, messed up relationships: we are living the dream. May I state my references/what I hear when playing this for the fifth time: early fast Buzzcocks, early Devo, Steve Albini/Big Black, Gene Wilder Willie Wonka. Great guitar work. Strong bass lines. Powerful straight ahead drumming. Three of the four guys take on vocals. Track one is spoken word “ad” about the band. Track eight is a quick instrumental. Play it LOUD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:16 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:03 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Der Plan – “Japlan” – [Bureau B.]

    Der Plan Der Plan Der Plan. Du bist wunderbar. Considered to be the originators of Neue Deutsche Welle, Der Plan, from Dusseldorf, began in 1979 as more of an industrial band but moved into the electronic beats that make them famous. They incorporate puppets, masks, wild costumes, home made sets, all looking like a kindergarten class taking on “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”, along with the angular, electronic driven “simplistic” synth sounds. In 1984, they made a video and LP called “Japlan” which led to a successful tour of Japan. The album did very well there but was not released in Germany. Until 2013.
    The album is 21 songs of angular, electronic, German, synth goofiness. Songs about space travel, pizza, insects, German three masted boats: you name it, it’s here. Vocals are that kind of droney, mid to low register kind of “I don’t care I’m just too bored” sensibility. Superb. And just imagine what it would have looked like on stage.Get ready to anti-dance.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 9:00 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Hypnopazuzu – “Create Christ, Sailor Boy” – [House of Mythology]

    Hypnopazuzu is a newish project by legendary David Tibet and Youth (Martin Glover, bassist of Killing Joke and other projects and producer). Supposedly this project was in the works for years, at least on a conversational level. Youth and Tibet are highly intimidating men so it is interesting on how to approach this big work. Musically, it is lush, rich and full, with stunning orchestrations combining strings and moog, synthesizers, guitar and percussion. All pieces are slow but never dull. Always moving, flowing, changing from quiet to full sound, contrasting and playing with Tibet’s vocals. Tibet has a unique, distinguishable voice, known immediately by those who are familiar with his work. His singing style is reminiscent of ancient church choral work, sometimes chant-like, always captivating. The songs are about… the hell if I know. Even reading the lyrics lost me. Which isn’t bad, they are just deep. Tibet is influenced by or follows and studies esoteric Christianity as well as sects of Tibetan Buddhism, ancient literary texts, gods and Gods both light and dark, magick and themes of apocalypse. Mix that up with older children’s tales, experimental sexuality, and selections from Gilgamesh and you have an idea of the range of topics being sung. Intimidating but heartfelt and sincere. This CD is a stunner and would work on almost every show at the station. Don’t be intimidated.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 7:01 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review


  • Next Page »

     

     Copyright © 2017   KFJC 89.7 FM
    12345 S. El Monte Road   Los Altos Hills, California   94022   phones