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Cambridge Treasury of English Prose, The (Volume Three) [coll] – [Caedmon]

In the 1950′s, Caedmon label put out a series of albums celebrating the Cambridge Treasury of English Prose. Here is vol. 4, Jane Austen to Emily and Charlotte Bronte with a lot of classic British white guy stuffed shirts in between. Criticism, essays, fiction, it’s all here. Straight ahead readings, wonderfully done, wonderfully 1950′s. All the stuff you should have read but really didn’t. Listen and relearn.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 11:37 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Orcutt, Bill & Chris Corsano – “Live At Various / Various Live” – [Palilalia]

    Master improvisers, Bill and Chris, take over and destroy.
    Did you see that movie “Unbroken” where the American soldiers are in a Japanese Concentration camp during WW II? And the masochistic guy in charge lines up all 125 American prisoners and forces them to punch the American soldier he is mad at/in love with, in the face. Just one after another. Again and again. That’s what listening to this feels like. The sound is pounding, sometimes feeling like there is no breathing room. Orcutt’s fret work is always amazing, like he is actually becoming the guitar to destroy it and transform it. Relentless. Like Corsano’s drum work. So overwhelmingly fast, changing patterns, rhythms, speeds. Like Orcutt. Each is the other, becoming the other. It’s often like violent transformation. There are quiet moments also, but even those are profoundly visceral.
    The four sides are taken from two cassettes from the 1990′s called “Live at Various” and “Various Live”. From Orcutt’s label which often gives little information. All you need to know is listen. And duck the punches.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 11:14 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Xome/Boar [coll] – [Breaching Static]

    Xome/Boar, Boar/Xome: it all depends on which version you get. Either way, hold on. Two sides from two of the most out there of electronic noise performers. Xome (Bob Scott or Bab Sato) has been around since 1989. Currently based out of Sacramento, Xome has earned his credentials, performing with so many big names in noise and other such things. His performances are vigorous and outrageous. He often sticks mics down his pants for feedback and other sounds. These tracks feel a bit more mature, tempered, even deeper in sound. Thoughtful, almost, but harsh sonic blasts. The last selections is noise with children’s toy advertisements.
    Boar, based out of Dubuque, Iowa, is a solo act of epic proportions. Headbanger noise? Harsh noise, higher pitched than Xome, in many cases. Rapid fire wall of sound screams and creams. Cathartic with poison. Ouch for sure with smiles.
    The gloriousness of NOISE is showcased by these two dynamic artists. Not for the weak of heart.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on May 2, 2017 at 10:23 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Longing For The Past [coll] – [Dust-To-Digital]

    Dust-To-Digital is a one of a kind label, focusing not only on quality collections but making sure packaging and information is as exquisite as the sounds. “Longing For the Past, The 78 RPM Era in Southeast Asia” continues this tradition. 78 recordings from the early 1900′s through the 1950′s, taken from Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam cover all ranges of music and styles from these countries at these times. Court music, wedding songs, instrumental pieces both solo and groups in all configurations, folk songs, known and unknown performers, village music, leaders chanting and on and on. So many sounds caught on 78′s and still intact to preserve a selection for us to hear on 4 CD’s. Initially this music was recorded merely as a means to sell Victrolas to a new market. You won’t buy it if there is nothing there to hear. European salesmen went out and recorded just about anything that moved. The selection in incredible. The accompanying book is a comprehensive review of how this started, who did it, where they went, the types of music and their history, notes on instrumentation and history of instruments and artists. Each song has three to five paragraphs of thorough explanation. Dive in, learn and enjoy.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 16, 2017 at 2:08 am
  • Filed as CD,International
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  • Hoosier Hot Shots – “Everybody Stomp” – [Proper Records]

    Hoosier Hot Shots ??? ???Everybody Stomp/Hot Lips??? ??? [Proper Records]

    The Hoosier Hot Shots were a four piece swing, jazz, corn pone, hillbilly country outfit from Indiana. Steeped in the tradition of vaudeville, the group took parts of the U.S. by storm with their weekly radio broadcasts, their stage presence, their prolific recording career and their continued appearance in Hollywood westerns. This collection, ???Everybody Stomp??? is a 4 CD set of 100 Hoosier Hot Shot delights. The guys were multi-instrumentalists, playing a variety of brass instruments as well as guitar, string bass (various), clarinet and some unique handmade instruments including the Zither and the Wabash Washboard. It consisted of a corrugated sheet metal washboard on a metal stand with various noisemakers attached, including bells and a multi-octave range of squeeze-type bicycle horns???. Also, slide whistles are in most numbers. The Hoosiers selected many standards and familiar songs of the time to cover with a jaunty, silly twist. Vocals include conversation between the musicians, with some of the singers using this high pitched kind of hillbilly accent. And don???t forget the penny whistles. Once beyond the goofiness, though, take a listen to the amazing musicianship between the members. It???s quite impressive. A fun addition, fitting many of the styles of our station???s shows.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 15, 2017 at 1:01 am
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • I’ve Got The Blues But I’m Too Damn Mean to Cry [coll] – [JSP Records]

    WOW. 4 CD’s. 103 tracks of protest in early American blues and gospel. Time period: 1910′s to the late 1930′s. We know the sound. No need to restate. So many artists, some well known and others obscure. Solos, choirs, groups, bands. But this is music of protest, some stated blatantly, others sung with humor, many layered with symbols and meaning to hide the target. These are songs, angry songs, desperate songs about abusive and oppressive conditions created and maintained by the white population relentlessly directed toward the black population. Despicable working conditions, police brutality, forced labor, prison horror. Continuous abuse and exploitation of one group of people by another. The variety of reactions to this oppression are as varied as the artists performing the songs. From thoughts of suicide to attacking and killing “Mr. Charlie”, from looking for the fabled promised land to all out revolution. The conditions and situations today of mistreatment and persecution are frighteningly and disgustingly no different then they were 100 years ago. These are essential tracks to play. Utilize this superb collection.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 14, 2017 at 11:14 pm
  • Filed as Blues,CD
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  • Mezzetin – “Odd Scene” – [Kinda Is Records]

    Mezzetin still is a mystery. Who is He/They? Where from? Where is the label from? Possibly a one man project. “Odd Scene” might be Mezzetin’s 3rd release. It’s all great outsider rock. One of the more distinctive voices around, still off-keyish and repetitive. Lyrics of love and memories and lost things. Mezzetin is diving into more experiments in sound this time, which makes it all the more interesting. Jangly guitars abound, still off. Infantile drumming, but in a good way. Track 9, “Mingling Haus” is 4 minutes of one note strummed on the guitar with wank drums and no vocals. If this was being done by a female Japanese noise performance artist, we would all be losing our shit. He’s not that. You still should be losing your shit.
    PLAY THIS!!!! Pick of the week.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 14, 2017 at 6:14 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Squarepusher – “Go Plastic” – [Warp Records Ltd]

    Holy f..in sh#t! Trying to find my head to reattach to my body after listening to this one. I feel like I should go smoke a cig or get electro shocked. Tom Jenkinson, aka Squarepusher, is a major player in IDM/EDM/whatever. I don’t need to tell you. He’s brilliant. And so is this album from 2001. It marked a change for him, a move away from the use of actual instruments and an experiment with digital, all digital. No computers on this album, though. It’s hardware: it’s samplers, sequencers, synthesizers and digital effects processors. All put to their amazing 2001 use. Many pieces are FAST: sounds reverberate back and forth and through so fast you would never be able to catch them. But the few “slow” pieces are equally sonically exciting. Effects come and go and then the drill and bass starts. Yes Yes Yes! Oh hell yes!

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 7:10 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Crow Crash Radio – “Live In The Trees” – [Self Released]

    Crow Crash Radio are a Bay area group that combine extended psychedelic jams with surf influences and drone. With Mark Pino on drums, Andrew Joron on theremin and Brian Strang on guitar, these musicians create a soundscape that is hypnotic and repetitive in a good way. Pino’s constant beats guide the listener while Strang puts down layers of guitar sound, filled out by Joron’s theremin drone and warble. An exceptional take on a unique mixing of styles, going to show there is always a new way to interpret genres.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 3:45 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Callier, Terry – “Live At Mother Blues 1964″ – [Premonition Records]

    An exceptional talent, frighteningly underrepresented in our library, Terry Callier was a prolific musician and singer, performing blues, soul and folk songs. This 1964 recording live at Chicago’s Mother Blues folk club, offers an intimate performance of Callier, singing eight quiet yet moving folk tunes accompanied by his guitar playing and two acoustic bass players. The moment he starts to sing the audience goes quiet, except for the random plate or cup being moved. His voice is rich and powerful with so much emotion. It kind of makes you melt. It’s like loneliness and sex and strength and pain and kindness and sadness all wrapped up into one. Folk singers were true story tellers and Callier is right up there with the best, weaving his tales with assuredness and power. Your knees will buckle.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2017 at 3:27 pm
  • Filed as Blues,CD
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  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

    Holy crapola. Power punk is alive and well, thank the gods. My neck still has a kink in it from flipping my head around so much to this album by the Uranium Club (a.k.a. Minneapolis Uranium Club). Eight cuts of right on, 21st century nihilist punk songs filled with snark and futility due to the world’s current situation. Smart, young dude intelligent lyrics about god, earth destruction, messed up relationships: we are living the dream. May I state my references/what I hear when playing this for the fifth time: early fast Buzzcocks, early Devo, Steve Albini/Big Black, Gene Wilder Willie Wonka. Great guitar work. Strong bass lines. Powerful straight ahead drumming. Three of the four guys take on vocals. Track one is spoken word “ad” about the band. Track eight is a quick instrumental. Play it LOUD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:16 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Uranium Club – “All of Them Naturals” – [Fashionable Idiots Records]

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 11:03 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Der Plan – “Japlan” – [Bureau B.]

    Der Plan Der Plan Der Plan. Du bist wunderbar. Considered to be the originators of Neue Deutsche Welle, Der Plan, from Dusseldorf, began in 1979 as more of an industrial band but moved into the electronic beats that make them famous. They incorporate puppets, masks, wild costumes, home made sets, all looking like a kindergarten class taking on “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”, along with the angular, electronic driven “simplistic” synth sounds. In 1984, they made a video and LP called “Japlan” which led to a successful tour of Japan. The album did very well there but was not released in Germany. Until 2013.
    The album is 21 songs of angular, electronic, German, synth goofiness. Songs about space travel, pizza, insects, German three masted boats: you name it, it’s here. Vocals are that kind of droney, mid to low register kind of “I don’t care I’m just too bored” sensibility. Superb. And just imagine what it would have looked like on stage.Get ready to anti-dance.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 9:00 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Hypnopazuzu – “Create Christ, Sailor Boy” – [House of Mythology]

    Hypnopazuzu is a newish project by legendary David Tibet and Youth (Martin Glover, bassist of Killing Joke and other projects and producer). Supposedly this project was in the works for years, at least on a conversational level. Youth and Tibet are highly intimidating men so it is interesting on how to approach this big work. Musically, it is lush, rich and full, with stunning orchestrations combining strings and moog, synthesizers, guitar and percussion. All pieces are slow but never dull. Always moving, flowing, changing from quiet to full sound, contrasting and playing with Tibet’s vocals. Tibet has a unique, distinguishable voice, known immediately by those who are familiar with his work. His singing style is reminiscent of ancient church choral work, sometimes chant-like, always captivating. The songs are about… the hell if I know. Even reading the lyrics lost me. Which isn’t bad, they are just deep. Tibet is influenced by or follows and studies esoteric Christianity as well as sects of Tibetan Buddhism, ancient literary texts, gods and Gods both light and dark, magick and themes of apocalypse. Mix that up with older children’s tales, experimental sexuality, and selections from Gilgamesh and you have an idea of the range of topics being sung. Intimidating but heartfelt and sincere. This CD is a stunner and would work on almost every show at the station. Don’t be intimidated.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 18, 2017 at 7:01 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Van Wissem, Josef & Jarmusch, Jim – “Concerning The Entrance Into Eternity” – [Important Records]

    Josef Van Wissem is a Dutch minimalist composer and lute player who won the Cannes Soundtrack Award for the score to “Only Lovers Left Alive”, the second film collaboration with film maker Jim Jarmusch. “Concerning….” is his first collaboration with Jarmusch, who also plays guitar on the five track album. Five quiet, mostly somber extended pieces of truly minimalist lute playing. Simple repeated plucking of several strings, with repeated chords against a backdrop of Jarmusch’s guitar feedback and wall of drone. Lushly contemplative, moody and dark. Track five is a minimalist lute solo with the title spoken as lyric at the end of the song. Gorgeous alone or perfect for mixing: I hear wind, the sound of children, waves, someone crying, laughter in the distance, power tools. It all works.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 12, 2017 at 8:18 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
  • Comment on this review
  • Theoreme – “L’appel Du Midi a Midi Pile” – [Bruit Direct Disques]

    A one woman band possibly named after Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film about the opening up of self-understanding through sexual encounter, sung in French, using post-post punk instrumentation and monotone speak singing? Sign me up. Track 1, “Let’s Start”, begins with a sound clip from Fela Kuti inviting someone, us, in to do what we came for. Sexual and more, almost revolutionary. And then the fun starts. Maisa D., who is Theoreme, sets up 9 tracks that are just discordant enough to be disturbing but beat driven enough to not necessarily make you dance, but make you stand sullenly in the dark club bouncing your head. Each piece is buzzy, as if the volume is up too high, or the cheap speakers can’t handle the bass. Very nice, like rusted wires scraped on your skin. It’s wonderful to hear something new, that references the past but sounds 21st century.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 11, 2017 at 11:48 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Kingsley, Gershon – “God Is a Moog” – [Idelsohn Society]

    Idelsohn Society For Musical Preservation (or in this case, Reboot Stereophonic label) continues to amaze with its focused and in depth look at American Jewish music and its influence on others. This release, “God Is A Moog” is a full collection of “the electronic prayers of Gershon Kingsley”. Kingsley is best known for bringing us the electronic pop culture AM radio wonder “Popcorn” as well as co-writing, with Jean Jacques Perrey, “Baroque Hoedown”, the theme of Disneyland’s Main Street Electrical Parade. But like many intensely creative people, he is much more than the sum of his parts. The book included in the double CD package gives incredible depth and insight into Gershon, his influences, his knowledge, his expertise, his values, his politics and his drive. “God Is A Moog” is heavily driven by all of these things, but with a uniqueness of character that makes these pieces so entertaining. Mixing his love of Moog and his love of Jewish prayer and holiday ritual, Gershon creates a Moog modern take on prayer and worship.
    Sometimes the mix sound is kitsch (which I approve of HIGHLY), but others go deeper. It is hard not to smile at someone chanting, singing, or talking about God and religious rituals while the Moog blips, bloops, bleeps all around through and about the texts. Possibly one of the most avant-garde things we have in our collection purely for its attempt to be mainstream. Shalom aleikhem.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 13, 2017 at 11:20 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Hoosier Hot Shots – “Everybody Stomp/Hot Lips” – [Proper Records]

    The Hoosier Hot Shots were a four piece swing, jazz, cornpone, hillbilly country outfit from Indiana. Steeped in the tradition of vaudeville, the group took parts of the U.S. by storm with their weekly radio broadcasts, their stage presence, their prolific recording career and their continued appearance in Hollywood westerns. This collection, “Everybody Stomp” is a 4 CD set of 100 Hoosier Hot Shot delights. The guys were multi-instrumentalists, playing a variety of brass instruments as well as guitar, string bass (various), clarinet and some unique handmade instruments including the Zither and the Wabash Washboard. It consisted of a corrugated sheet metal washboard on a metal stand with various noisemakers attached, including bells and a multi-octave range of squeeze-type bicycle horns”. Also, slide whistles are in most numbers. The Hoosiers selected many standards and familiar songs of the time to cover with a jaunty, silly twist. Vocals include conversation between the musicians, with some of the singers using this hight pitched kind of hillbilly accent. And don’t forget the penny whistles. Once beyond the goffiness, though, take a listen to the amazing musicianship between the members. It’s quite impressive. A fun addition, fitting many of the styles of our station’s shows.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 12, 2017 at 10:41 pm
  • Filed as CD,Jazz
  • Comment on this review
  • Price, Florence – “Oak, The, Mississippi River Suite, Symphony No. 3″ – [Koch International]

    Florence Price is an early, lesser known 20th Century composer of classical music, whose style is often referred to as being in the nationalistic style. This recording, by The Women’s Philharmonic, shows off three of her works. At times sounding like Aaron Copland and Tchaikovsky, with hints of southern spirituals, these pieces offer a full symphonic range of sound and feeling. At times there are melodies that seem like they could be used as early soundtracks to cartoons, where the tunes do not flow quite so simplistically. Why she is an important addition to our collection is because Florence Price was the first African American woman to gain acclaim nationally for her music and to have it played in symphonic halls. At a time when racism and sexism held back and destroyed millions of people, acceptance and appreciation of her and her music was a profound action by a country divided. Listen and celebrate our elders.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 8, 2017 at 4:28 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • La Compilation [coll] – [Golf Channel Recordings]

    Hangouts come and go but nowadays someone always has a recording to bring back the memories. Between 2006 and 2012 in New York City’s downtown, the restaurant/bar/hangout Mangiami (Eat Me) was THE place for clubsters, models, cool neighbors, freaks. losers and those in the know to hang out. On Monday nights local and international dj’s would spin records on the old Technics turntables set up at the bar and the place would supposedly ignite. This compilation of 8 tunes gives the listener the feel of what it was like. Dance tunes, some with simple vocals, create a constant beat to help you slug down the drink of the moment. Hinting at futuresynth ideas, also pulling from dance rhythms of the 1980′s and 1990′s, infused with a contemporary sensibility, this was the sound. The constant thump gets under your skin and soon your head starts rocking side to side. It’s a medium cool kind of beat, no HI-NRG here. Drop ins of electric piano riffs, vocal samples, bells, high hat. A little too slow for a jog around the reservoir, but perfect for strutting through the Village. On canstant play in my 1997 Lexus.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on January 28, 2017 at 1:55 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review


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