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  • Archives
      KFJC On-Line Reviews
    What KFJC has added to their library and why...

    Anal – “Zero Beats Per Minute” – [K.A.K./Kraut and Kelt Records]

    It’s too obvious to say “I love Anal” or “Anal is so good” so I won’t. But, this is really a good album. Anal, actually Jody Evans from Wales, was a production assistant to Julian Cope in the mid 1990’s. He asked to play around with the electronic equipment and came up with this brilliant exploration of all sounds electronic: beats, anti-beats, anti-rave. It was so good that Dorian and Julian Cope decided to release the outcome on their solo release label K.A.K. This is such a highly praised work by so many that it has been rereleased with more info, but we have the original. Amazing.
    12 songs of unique electronic noodling. Call it IDM, EDM, electronic, whatever. So many variations of sound blips and bleeps. Love this so much. Listen and you’ll love Anal, too.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 18, 2018 at 4:21 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Chomsky%2C+Noam+-+%22Imperial+Presidency%2C+The%22+-+%5BAK+Press+Audio%5D

    Noam Chomsky is, of course, the seasoned voice of far left intellectual political thought and social observation. This lecture, given shortly after G.W. Bush won his second term, tracks the continuous actions the U.S. plays in its role as world imperialist dominator. Chomsky tracks the elaborate plans the USA government creates and implements, from post WW II up through the time of the lecture. The manipulation of world law by the U.S. is astounding and not surprising. It helps to understand where we are today. This just didn’t happen. Everyone is complicit. It is always fascinating to me to listen to Chomsky: not just to his ideas but to his tone, his meter, his style. It is so soothing, rational and calm. He talks about the most heinous atrocities and manipulations of rule for power and the devastating effects on millions of people, yet he does so with such ease. No histrionics. It’s almost frightening. Though the CD is tracked it can be played as one long piece. Enjoy.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on June 9, 2018 at 11:52 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Dagger Moth – “Silk Around The Marrow” – [Toten Schwan]

    “Silk Around the Marrow” is the second release by solo artist Dagger Moth or Sara Ardizzoni. She is a guitarist and vocalist who uses these tools as well as minimal electronics, noises and loops to create a dark yet inviting atmosphere. Ardizzoni plays the guitar with a rich variety of tones, colors and shades of gray, plucking quietly or strumming with loud wild abandon while electronic foundations guide and center the pieces. Her husky voice sings of issues of identity and the trials of a human in the 21st century. Each song is so well executed, hinting at minimalism, repeating patterns and structures. It’s too dark for pop music but I wish this was the direction pop went: heavy, complicated, a bit frightening and always interesting. The last track is a collaboration with Marc Ribot. A true eye opening surprise.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on April 13, 2018 at 10:45 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Grails – “Chalice Hymnal” – [Temporary Residence Limited]

    Last summer we were visiting our friends in Cloverdale. It was god awful hot so they decided to take us down the road to the Russian River for a swim to cool down. After trekking across the riverbed rocks, we got to a place in the river that was shallow enough for us to set our beach chairs and just sit with the current gliding over us. It was not really my idea of pretty: it was hot, brownish, dry with plants a sort of dusty green. But when I finally settled into it I began to appreciate the calm, serenity and turmoil of this oddly idyllic spot with the cool water pushing around us. I often remember this place even though it may not have been my idea of a place to go.
    I feel this way about “Chalice Hymnal”, Grails first album in six years. It’s not what I might have expected but when I let it settle in, it works. It is a lush four sided continued exploration into the sounds they have developed over their career. Cinematic is definitely the phrase for these pieces. Each piece of psych rock post-rock is like a soundtrack to a series of short films, not clearly related but surprisingly united. Guitars and electronics play heavy with bass and drums, plus mellotron weaving dreamy explorations on some tracks while others perform a more beat driven journey. Most of the shorter tracks left me wanting for more. The longer tracks filled my need for meditative wandering. Like the river experience, not necessarily where I wanted to go but definitely something I keep remembering after several listens.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on March 5, 2018 at 9:00 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Buba Monopolskij – “Records I Did Being Jailed” – [Monopolka]

    Buba Monopolskij is supposedly Monopolka, yet another alias for the founder of Monopolka Records from Moscow. These two tracks on this limited edition of 50 already sold out recording were supposedly created during Buba’s two years in jail. Mouth as horn sounds, radio channels, static, other sounds all put together quickly, a brief respite on track one of a selection that sounds like the Residents. Track two has what sounds like electronic toys or games or video games all sped up plus crushing static plus who knows what else. Nine minutes in not quite hell but a very confused state. Fun harshness.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 27, 2018 at 10:14 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Crank St.urge.on – “Drastic Ishmael Effects” – [Monopolka]

    Holy Fuck. Crank Sturgeon, hailing from Maine, is a god of noise, musique concrete, found sound, etc. and he knows what he is doing. You know when you listen to something and the sound is right and you say, “Man, this person really is good.”?…. Crank Sturgeon. On a par with Nurse With Wound’s brilliant “Sylvie and Babs” album, “Drastic Ishmael Effects” is a faster more chaotic version of the same themes of popular culture churned up and slashed in rapid fire sound bitebyte succession. The tracks are so fast and humorous and satisfyingly disturbing. Insanity can be fun with culture trash. Crank tears it up. Crank talks along with one word repeated over and over from a sound clip. Crank takes an exercise recording, gets it stuck then folds it, twists it, layers it, distorts it to satisfying proportion. “He wants to ride me like a horse” will forever stick in your sonic wormhole. The CD skipping sound is intentional.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 27, 2018 at 9:06 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Vono – “Dinner Fur 2” – [Bureau-B]

    How Dieter can you get? Not much more Dieter than this!!!!! Early 1980’s Berlin (of course) dark wave brothers duo, Norbert and Volker Schultze. Minimalist synth with bass. Minimal lyrics shout spoken rather than sung. Electro pop dance angular German wave akin to DAF but more stripped down and challenging. What they did was radical at the time, with it’s angular beats and sometimes shouted simple lyrics about such things as lottery numbers. They became very popular in Germany with the club kids with the release of their first album but then decided to add drums and guitar and … well… that just didn’t cut the mustard. Put on your black parachute pants, stand next to some venetian blinds, turn the tv on static and angular dance to your hearts content.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 27, 2018 at 8:01 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Bardo Pond Featuring Acid Mothers Temple, Guru Guru – “Acid Guru Pond” – [Fire Records]

    Collaboration projects can be iffy. This one works on many levels, all satisfying, intriguing and inventive. Acid Mothers Temple (ACT) and Guru Guru have worked together in band variations to form new interpretations of their individual projects. Bardo Pond chose to work with the two to make a new Bardo Pond project, Acid Guru Pond. Two LP’s, four sides, five tracks, luscious color. These pieces really do sound like a mix of the three groups. You can hear their styles push through but then get enveloped in the soup of the jams. Long jams. Some psychedelic, some drone, some letting loose with guitar, drums, bass in an almost free jazz interpretation. A crowd pleaser for sure and for those in the know. Enjoy all the colors.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 27, 2018 at 7:25 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Pollock, Jackson & Krasner, Lee – “Two Dialogues: Jackson Pollock & Lee Krasner” – [Sooj Records, Inc.]

    Two of America’s leading Abstract Expressionist painters, also married, interviewed at different stages in their career. Pollock’s interview, from 1950, by his neighbor, is one of the only two recordings of Pollock’s voice. Though many considered him inarticulate in interviews, this shows him thoughtful, though uncomfortable, in answering questions about modern art and his process. He was probably tired of talking about his process. Clipped answers dominate. Lee Krasner’s interview comes later in her life, in the 1980’s. It is the more intriguing of the two interviews. She is strong in her opinions, refusing to be led down the way of the interviewer. She is probably tired of some of the questions, frustrated at being drilled on answering things she does not feel she should answer or has the perspective to answer. The obligatory questions about Pollock come up, even 30 plus years after his death and the fact that she was an established artist in her own right. Great for mixing, especially when Krasner’s phone keeps ringing and she starts telling people how to answer it.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 27, 2018 at 6:19 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Sylvers, Foster – “Foster Sylvers” – [Fever Dream]

    Foster Sylvers was the younger member of the late 1970’s pop soul group The Sylvers. Foster attempted a solo career to parallel Michael Jackson and many similarities are apparent in dress, style, vocal skills, moves. Yet Foster never quite hit it like Michael. His big hit, which was also part of The Sylvers repertoire, was “Misdemeanor”, a soul hit which got the Soul Train audience dancing. The 12 tracks on this collection demonstrate his captivating voice, his high notes and funky kid take on songs about getting the girl and how he really loves her. Like, he REALLY loves her. A lot. Great sugar coated pop funk soul tunes that bring you back to the 1970’s. Do not miss the amazing “Lullabye/Uncle Albert” mix up/mash up. It’s a bold interpretation that goes psychedelic funk with an acid trip rendering of the spoken word part of Uncle Albert.
    As an adult, Sylvers got into trouble and oddly many of the titles on this collection explain it. So, it wasn’t a “Misdemeanor” is all I’m going to say. Connect the dots while you get funky.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 25, 2018 at 10:24 pm
  • Filed as CD,Soul
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  • McGurdy, Ed – “Best of Daliance, The” – [Rhino Records Inc.]

    If the word “titillating” makes you blush or gives you a chub, this album’s for you. Naughty. Bawdy. Tawdry. All these “aw” sounding words to help explain “The Best of Daliance”, taken from a series of albums put out in the 1950’s on the then new Elektra Records, based on the 18th century songs of Elizabethan writer Tom D’Urfey. Put together and sung by Ed McCurdy, a 1950’s Greenwich Village fixture and naughty sort in his own right, these songs are all suggestive larks describing couples… or trios… or groups of people enjoying themselves in the best way possible. Lots of lines about “stoking the fire”, his long pole pushing into the oven, the maidens cherry complexion loosing it’s color and on and on. Blacksmiths must have been having sex all the time. Career change at 55? Possibly. The musical interpretations are smooth, taking us back to the early 1700’s when there wasn’t much to do but constantly milk the cow. Alan Arkin plays flute!!!! and Erik Darling, later of the Weavers, plays banjo, taking the place of lute. The CD cover is pink fuzzy suede. Go figure.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 12, 2018 at 10:02 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • McGurdy, Ed – “Best of Daliance, The” – [Rhino Records Inc.]

    If the word “titillating” makes you blush or gives you a chub, this album’s for you. Naughty. Bawdy. Tawdry. All these “aw” sounding words to help explain “The Best of Daliance”, taken from a series of albums put out in the 1950’s on the then new Elektra Records, based on the 18th century songs of Elizabethan writer Tom D’Urfey. Put together and sung by Ed McCurdy, a 1950’s Greenwich Village fixture and naughty sort in his own right, these songs are all suggestive larks describing couples… or trios… or groups of people enjoying themselves in the best way possible. Lots of lines about “stoking the fire”, his long pole pushing into the oven, the maidens cherry complexion loosing it’s color and on and on. Blacksmiths must have been having sex all the time. Career change at 55? Possibly. The musical interpretations are smooth, taking us back to the early 1700’s when there wasn’t much to do but constantly milk the cow. Alan Arkin plays flute!!!! and Erik Darling, later of the Weavers, plays banjo, taking the place of lute. The CD cover is pink fuzzy suede. Go figure.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 12, 2018 at 10:02 pm
  • Filed as A Library,CD
  • Comment on this review
  • Ostertag, Bob – “DJ of The Month” – [Seeland Records]

    Bob Ostertag is a true Renaissance Man: author, professor, political activist, composer, electronic musician, journalist, creator of his own software based laptop instruments and more. His work stands out for its uniqueness, creativity, political stance, beauty and challenging qualities. “DJ of The Month” is a 40 minute single track of electronic onslaught and subtlety, mixed together and separated. Sounds flash past and reverberate around and through the listener, taking them on a unique meditative journey. It does become hypnotic in its movement of sound. The piece is meant as a meditation requiring focus and concentration. I know a few of the DJ’s who will play the whole thing. So worth it.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 7, 2018 at 12:30 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Funky Chimes [coll] – [Sdban Records]

    I live for this type of collection: “Funky Chimes”, a collection of 27 Belgian session musicians and sort of stars from the 1970’s, experimenting with “funk, jazz, latin and other groovy genres.” Did you get that it’s from Belgium, a place most people don’t initially think of for it’s music (which is wrong, of course)? It’s library music. It’s songs for commercials. It’s music your 1970’s Belgian parents would play to relax and feel cool with. The overwhelming notes with photos of each album cover should be more than enough to convince you of the outright grooviness of this stuff. Just look at some of those covers. And the names of the groups and songs: The Indian Sound of… Black Foot, Selectasound ’88 & The Bob Boon Singers, The Free Pop Electronic Concept and on and on. Of course, the stunner among stunners is Hearts of Soul and Shampoo performing “We Love the Policeman”. This is the more challenging second release in the series, the first being “Funky Chicken”. Looking for it as I type.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 6, 2018 at 10:55 pm
  • Filed as CD,International
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  • Battles – “EP C/B EP” – [Warp Records Ltd]

    Battles: math rock, post rock, art rock. Whatever. These two EP’s from 2004, brought together as a double album, are Battles as a foursome, including Tyondai Braxton. That’s early Battles. Exquisite interplay of guitars, bass, keyboard and drums, spilling out patterns, breaking them apart, overlapping, interpreting, adjusting. This is the project at it’s beginnings, establishing a foundation of what would follow. Calculate away.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on February 6, 2018 at 8:41 pm
  • Filed as 12-inch,A Library
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  • Still, William Grant – “Works By William Grant Still” – [New World Records (2)]

    William Grant Still was a 20th Century classical composer, creating pieces often in the neo-romantic and neo-impressionism style. Born in Woodville, Mississippi and spending most of his early days in Little Rock, Arkansas, he was musically influenced by his step father’s record collection. Listening to opera as well as learning to play violin honed his interest in classical music. Seeing his fist orchestra perform at Oberlin college settled it: he would compose music. This did not come easy, of course. He played in jazz bands, wrote jazz arrangements for Artie Shaw, and travelled to California in hopes of writing music for films and television. He had minor success with this but it influenced his ideas on orchestrations. Still was the first African American composer to “secure extensive publication and significant performances” of his work. He was considered the patriarch of Black classical music, being the culmination of the Harlem Renaissance. Even though he studied under Edgard Varese, his style went toward a more traditional sound.
    The selections on this collection cover many of his diverse projects, from fully orchestrated pieces to simpler tunes composed to poems by Black poets. The Ennanga pieces are his attempt to connect to his African heritage, though at the time he wrote them he did not have access to African music recordings. These pieces became his interpretation. Just like the Florence Price work at our station, this is an important addition to our collection.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on December 10, 2017 at 11:16 am
  • Filed as A Library,CD
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  • Delerue, Georges – “Jules & Jim/Georges Delerue:film Music of Francois Truffaut” – [Nonesuch]

    Like Bernard Herrmann was to Alfred Hitchcock and John Williams is to Steven Spielberg, Georges Delerue was the musical connection and interpreter to Francois Truffaut. Delerue scored music for over 200 films, composed operas, sound and light shows, ballets and chamber pieces, but his eleven collaborations with French New Wave film master Truffaut stand out in soundtrack history. Delerue was able to interpret Truffaut’s rich tales of romance and heartbreak, mystery and intrigue and the process of film making itself (Day For Night). From fully orchestrated pieces to the familiar solo upright piano solo, “Charlie” from Shoot the Piano Player, these performances by the London Sinfonietta showcase a rich understanding as to why Delerue is so important to film. Use as an auditory palette cleanser or entremets between your sonic onslaught.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on December 9, 2017 at 12:47 am
  • Filed as CD,Soundtrack
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  • Trickett, Ed/Bok, Gordon/Muir, Ann Mayo/ – “All Shall Be Well Again” – [Folk-Legacy Records, Inc.]

    Folk trio, Ed Trickett, Gordon Bok and Ann Mayo Muir have been making and performing folk music since the early 1970’s and before. Hailing from the New England states, the three sing of places and events belonging to the East Coast and it’s history with Great Britain. Songs of sailing (Bok is also a boatman), ancient English mystics, life in the country, children’s ballads and more fill the 12 numbers with quiet, sadness, an overwhelming sense of memory, and an almost painful longing for the past. With just acoustic guitar and vocals, harmonious vocals playing with and around each other, the songs remind me of how quality folk music is the true predecessor to so much of the music of sadness that we love at the station. Just really one of my favorite recordings. Beautiful anytime of the day or night.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on December 8, 2017 at 11:59 pm
  • Filed as CD,Country
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  • Shane, Jackie – “Any Other Way” – [Numero Group]

    This is the most amazing thing I have reviewed in a long time. Jackie Shane, born in Nashville, soul singer who worked a lot in Toronto, left the scene in 1971 not to be heard from again for decades until just recently. Born a woman in a man’s body, she lived trans and gay, never apologizing, never turning away. Proud of who she was.
    She was a soul singer supreme who would TESTIFY to the audience about herself, about how they needed to deal with it and get it together. Her voice went from cool to wail and all in between. The tracks on this exquisite collection sizzle and pop with covers of soul classics as well as lesser known, but equally superb songs. “In My Tenement” is THE hit, as are the numbers on the Live disc which keep up the full on banter she would give to her wudiences. Read the booklet. An amazing life including gangsters and kidnapping. Jackie Shane is the real deal.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on December 3, 2017 at 9:46 pm
  • Filed as CD,Soul
  • 1 comment
  • Dusty, Slim – “Singer From Down Under” – [EMI Records]

    Australian cultural icon and superstar of Australian country music, making popular the style known as “the bush ballad”, and having recorded 106 albums up to the time of his death in 2003, Slim was a unique brand. The 12 songs on “Singer From Down Under” all feel very familiar. The playing style is simple with Dusty’s straight forward drawl. Songs about drinking and drinking, and then drinking with colloquailisms thrown in for good measure. The whole thing is a hoot. Worthy of some good down home fun. Play it then get a drink in the lobby.

  • Reviewed by Naysayer on December 3, 2017 at 8:21 pm
  • Filed as CD,Country
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